Category Archives: OS X

FlippedBITS: Four Password Myths

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from TidBITS: Apple News for the Rest of Us http://tidbits.com/article/13651?rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tidbits_main+%28TidBITS%3A+Mac+News+for+the+Rest+of+Us%29

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The curious case of the persistent image

The case of the persistent image

The other day I was working on some blog posts, and when I pulled up an image in Preview to edit it, I noticed something odd. It looked like the Preview window was transparent, and that I was seeing a window through it. I thought nothing of it until a few minutes later when I closed a number of open windows on my new 27-inch iMac and noticed that a faint “echo” of those windows was visible on my desktop photo. I realized I was seeing some image persistence.

This is nothing new; back in the days of PCs with cathode-ray tube monitors, it was quite common to see the C: prompt burned into some screens, visible even when the monitor was turned off! But this was a bit of a surprise, since I hadn’t experienced image persistence for a long time. And on a brand new 27-inch iMac? Ouch.

I’m guessing that something kept my iMac display from going to sleep, resulting in the “burn in.” I usually have the display set to go completely dark after 15 minutes, and had never seen this happen before on this or my previous 27-inch iMac.

Immediately I went to the Apple support communities and searched for image persistence and image retention, and I found that this has been a fairly common issue with the new devices. Not only are iMacs prone to persistent images, but some MacBooks are also seeing the problem. (Mike Rose experienced the image persistence issue specific to the MacBook Pro Retina models with LG panels, and ended up having his screen replaced.) There are a number of people who were so concerned that they brought their devices back to the Apple Store and asked for a replacement, but Apple believes that the problem is common to IPS (in-plane switching) LCD panels and not a real issue.

Apple recommends doing exactly what I had been doing — setting display sleep after 15 minutes of non-use. Fortunately, they also have instructions on what to do if your get a burned-in image despite using display sleep. In knowledge base article HT5455, “Avoiding image persistence on Apple displays,” there’s a section on using a screen saver to eliminate a persistent image:

  1. From the Apple () menu, choose System Preferences, and then click “Desktop & Screen Saver.”
  2. Click the Screen Saver tab.
  3. Choose a screen saver.
  4. Set the “Start screen saver” time to be shorter than the “Display sleep” and “Computer sleep” settings in the Energy Saver pane of System Preferences.
  5. To clear the persistent image, allow the screen saver to run for approximately as long as the image was being displayed.

I had no idea how long the image had been “stuck” on my screen, so I just decided to change the screen saver time to five minutes and the display sleep time to three hours and let the “Flurry” screen saver run for that length of time.

Sure enough, once I returned to my iMac this morning, the annoying persistent images were nowhere to be found. One commenter in the support community suggests that this might be a problem with all IPS LCD panels made by LG, and that this didn’t happen with display panels made by Samsung — a company that Apple seems to want to avoid at this time due to the lawsuit situation going on.

Regardless of the cause, it’s refreshing to know that there is a way to correct it and that this does not cause permanent damage to the display. I’ve changed my iMac settings to go to screen saver after five minutes and to display sleep after 15 minutes, and hopefully I’ll never see those persistent images again.

Have any TUAW readers experienced this problem? Did running the screen saver work to eliminate the ghosted images? Let us know in the comments.

The curious case of the persistent image originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Mon, 18 Feb 2013 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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from TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog http://www.tuaw.com/2013/02/18/the-curious-case-of-the-persistent-image/

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Use These Keyboard Shortcuts To Reboot Or Shutdown Your Mac Instantly [OS X Tips]

Keyboard

I’ve been a Mac user since the Performa 638 CD I purchased in 1994, and I had no idea these shortcuts existed. While I wouldn’t recommend them to every Mac user, if you’re comfortable with the potential issues of immediately shutting down your Mac, you’ll want to learn these post-haste.

Note that when we refer to the Power button below, you may see an Eject button instead. Use either the Power or Eject button, whichever is in the upper right of your keyboard, to activate the following instant actions.

To reboot your Mac instantly, hit Control-Command-Power/Eject. To immediately shut down your Mac, hit Command-Option-Control-Power/Eject. To Log yourself (or any user) off of your Mac without using a menu or mouse, hit Command-Shift-Q.

To put your Mac right to sleep, the poor dear, hit Command-Option-Power, and hold them down for two seconds or so. To turn off your Mac’s display immediately, hit Shift-Control-Power. Go ahead, try it! To wake your screen back up, just hit the Spacebar key.

Now you have the magic keys to the kingdom, at least as far as shutting down or restarting your Mac on the fly without needing to use an onscreen button, mouse, or menu. Just remember that with great power comes great responsibility.

Source: OS X Daily
Image: Håkan Dahlström, Flickr

from Cult of Mac http://www.cultofmac.com/210965/use-these-keyboard-shortcuts-to-reboot-or-shutdown-your-mac-instantly-os-x-tips/

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How to reset Lion back to the Setup Assistant

There have been previous hints on how to reset earlier versions of Mac OS X to delete users so that it boots to the Setup Assistant again. This can be useful if you are passing on or selling your computer to someone else. The most recent hint was posted in 2007 for Mac OS X 10.5 and there were significant corrections included in the comments. There is also a command that changed in 10.7 (also in the older hint’s comments) and even with the modifications suggested in the comments, the hint is still incomplete.

So instead of adding yet another modification in the comments of a hint related to 10.5, I thought I would submit a new hint brining everything together from the old hint, its comments, changes needed for 10.7, and the missing items I have found. This provides a current version of the hint for 10.7 and presumably 10.8 …

from MacOSXHints.com http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20121202080339900

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New Command-Line Utilities in Mountain Lion

“caffeinate” is a fun name.

from Daring Fireball http://apple.blogoverflow.com/2012/07/interesting-new-unix-commandsbinaries-in-os-x-mountain-lion/

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Use Mountain Lion’s new Wi-Fi Scan utility to optimize your home wireless network

A new Wi-Fi scanner tool is in Mountain Lion’s refreshed Wi-Fi Diagnostics Utility, allowing users to easily discover Wi-Fi networks within range and view related data not available from Apple’s Wi-Fi menu bar item. Comparable to third-party Wi-Fi stumbler tool iStumbler, the scan tool provides data for BSSID, band, protocol, channel, signal strength, security, and more. It also has Active and Passive scan modes.

From the window, you can see what networks are in your area and their strength. Some maneuvering of base stations can increase coverage to the outermost areas of your house, and it is much, much easier to see slight differences in numerical signal vs. noise strength over those four waves Apple uses in its Wi-Fi menu.

Additionally, by looking at what Channel (1-13) your base station is on, compared to your neighbors (or other base stations in your house), you can often find the least used channel in your area to improve reception.

If you are interested in using the new Wi-Fi scanner tool, OSX Daily provided the necessary steps for quick access:

  1. From any Finder window, hit Command+Shift+G and enter the path: /System/Library/CoreServices/
  2. Locate “Wi-Fi Diagnostics” and drag and drop it into Launchpad or the OS X Dock for easy access

Now that you have the Wi-Fi app in an easy-to-find location:

  1. Launch Wi-Fi Diagnostics and ignore the frontmost menu, instead hit Command+N to summon the new “Network Utilities” window (this is also where the wireless signal strength measurement tool is located now)
  2. Click the “Wi-Fi Scan” tab to get started with the wireless stumbler tool.
Related articles

from 9to5Mac http://9to5mac.com/2012/07/31/use-mountain-lions-new-wi-fi-scan-utility-to-optimize-your-home-wireless-network/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+9To5Mac-MacAllDay+%289+to+5+Mac+-+Apple+Intelligence%29

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Bring Back Save As To Mountain Lion, Weep With Joy [OS X Tips]

Welcome back! We’ve missed you!

When OS X Lion debuted, our old-friend Save As… had been sent packing for a new imposter, Duplicate. We tried to like this new one, but wow was it not the same. Luckily, Mountain Lion has brought Save As… back, only in a sneaky, less than obvious way.

We want to share how to see the Save As… command, of course, with a simple key press, but we’ll go even one step further, clueing you in on how to return good-old-Save As… to its former glory, in the exalted spot it used to reside in. Here’s how.

If you’ve upgraded to Mountain Lion, you’ll be able to do this right away. Launch something simple, like Text Edit, from the Applications folder. Open a file or just make changes to the one that’s been restored to your view. Then, click on the File menu. Notice, Duplicate, the meanie, is still there. Now press the Option key. Huzzah! There’s Save As… hiding out and waiting for you. It’s even got a shortcut, though it requires the Option key: Shift-Command-Option-S will bring you back to the nirvana state of Save As… functionality.

But what if you really want to go back to the way it should be the way it was? There’s a simple way to do this, devoid of any hacking or terminal-fu.

Simply launch System Preferences from the dock, and click through to Keyboard, then Keyboard Shortcuts. Click on Application shortcuts in the left hand column, and then All Applications on the right. Then, click on the plus sign underneath the right hand column. Type in Save As… in the Menu Title field, and then click into the Keyboard Shortcut field. Now, press the keys you want for your shortcut, like Command-Shift-S. Mac OS X Mountain Lion will add that into the field, and clicking Add will commit it to memory.

Do the same for Duplicate, only adding a shortcut like Command-Option-Shift-D. You should now have two new shortcuts that will work across applications with the Duplicate/Save As… functionality. Test it out – in Text Edit, if you click on the File Menu, you’ll see both Save As… and Duplicate, and their associated keyboard shortcuts. Now that’s worth the price of admission, right there.

Super secret pro tip? If you actually remap Duplicate to Command=Shift-Option-S, you’ll hide it, much in the same way Save As… was hidden when you started this whole rigamarole. Pretty fancy, eh?

Now if only Apple would realize that Save As… is the way to go and restore it by default, we’d all breathe a bit easier.

Are you using OS X Mountain Lion? Got a tip you want to share with us? (sorry, you need Javascript to see this e-mail address) or leave a comment below.

Via: TUAW

from Cult of Mac http://www.cultofmac.com/181989/bring-back-save-as-to-mountain-lion-weep-with-joy-os-x-tips/

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